Digital Forensics Investigator: A Road Few Have Traveled

So, what is DFIR? Digital Forensics and Incident Response are commonly abbreviated as DFIR and refer to a particular skill set in computer security and forensics. This article will focus on the digital forensics part of this unholy union of the two fields.

“Computer Forensics is the retrieval, analysis, and use of digital evidence in a civil or criminal investigation” (Hayes, 2019).

Note the emphasis in the definition of the use of digital evidence in a civil or criminal investigation. The importance of understanding the legality of forensics cannot be overstated. Just as there are computer hacking laws that you can be convicted if you hack into a system without authorization such as the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), it is the same with computer forensics investigations…..

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Corporate Cybersecurity: What You Need to Know

Any well-meaning business shouldn’t take cybersecurity lightly. For sure, the threats to corporate data are becoming even more complicated for enterprises to handle. Corporate espionage, sabotage, and data theft are just some of the most critical threats that enterprises across all industries should worry about.

So what do startups need to know when it comes to securing their data from serious cyber threats?

If anything, businesses of all sizes shouldn’t rely on gut feeling when it comes to critical decisions related to cybersecurity. You have to make sure that you’re fully informed……

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Burn, drown, or smash your phone: Forensics can extract data anyway

Smartphone – Global Communication Concept

Damaged mobile phones are still filled with plenty of useful data, according to researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), which is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce. NIST published the results of a recent study on forensic methods for getting data from mobile damaged mobile phones. It tested the tools that law enforcement uses to hack phones and found that even if criminals attempt to destroy the evidence by burning, drowning, or smashing their phones, forensic tools can still successfully extract data from the phone’s electronic components…..

 

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Government Report Reveals Its Favorite Way to Hack iPhones, Without Backdoors

Feds are once again demanding encryption backdoors, but its own data shows it can extract data from phones without them.

The US government is once again reviving its campaign against strong encryption, demanding that tech companies build backdoors into smartphones and give law enforcement easy, universal access to the data inside them.

At least two companies that sell phone-cracking tools to agencies like the FBI have proven they can defeat encryption and security measures on some of the most advanced phones on the market. And a series of recent tests conducted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) reveal that, while there remain a number of blind spots, the purveyors of these tools have become experts at reverse engineering smartphones in order to extract troves of information off the devices and the apps installed on them……

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The Decade In Trademark Litigation

There is still a lot we can learn from looking at the decade past at a macro level.

Considering that we are starting a new decade while continuing to face such questions as “Are We Running Out of Trademarks?,” I thought it would be a good idea to first look at what existing trademark owners did with the trademarks they had last decade. If only because that is easier to quantify for a practitioner than existential challenges to the “assumption that there exists an inexhaustible supply of unclaimed trademarks that are at least as competitively effective as those already claimed.”….

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The Cost of Avast’s Free Antivirus: Companies Can Spy on Your Clicks

Avast is harvesting users’ browser histories on the pretext that the data has been ‘de-identified,’ thus protecting your privacy. But the data, which is being sold to third parties, can be linked back to people’s real identities, exposing every click and search they’ve made.

Updated January 27, 2020
Your antivirus should protect you, but what if it’s handing over your browser history to a major marketing company?

Relax. That’s what Avast told the public after its browser extensions were found harvesting users’ data to supply to marketers. Last month, the antivirus company tried to justify the practice by claiming the collected web histories were stripped of users’ personal details before being handed off…..

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INCREDIBLE GROWTH OF FORENSICS AS A SERVICE MARKET 2025

Global Forensics as a Service Market was valued at $ +9,458 million in 2019 and is estimated to reach $ +22,905 million by 2025, growing at a CAGR of +13% during the study period.

The demand for Forensics as a Service Market is expected to be driven by stringent government regulations and the increasing instances of cyber-attacks on enterprises. Moreover, the massive use of the Internet of Things (IoT) devices is expected to increase the demand for digital forensics software during the forecast period….

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GFPD launches “Security Camera Registry and Mapping” program

GREAT FALLS — The Great Falls Police Department has launched the Security Camera Registry and Mapping program (SCRAM).

The program allows people and businesses to register their exterior surveillance camera systems so that, in the event of a crime near their home or business, the police may contact the system owner to see if their camera(s) possibly recorded an event relevant to the investigation.

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Is Willfulness a Perquisite to Trademark Damages? SCOTUS Hears Oral Argument

On January 14, 2020, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in Romag Fasteners, Inc. v. Fossil Inc., et al., in which the Court is poised to resolve a circuit split on whether willfulness is a perquisite to award a trademark infringer’s profits.

Counsel for Romag framed the issue by negating defendant’s chief textual argument, i.e. that the phrase “subject to principles of equity” in 15 U.S.C. § 1117(a) does not import a willfulness requirement for disgorgement of an infringer’s profits. Yet Counsel also focused on Romag’s own textual argument, based on the 1999 Amendments to the Lanham Act, i.e. that Congress’ decision to use “willful” to modify 1125(c) dilution claims, but not 1125(a) infringement claims, evidences Congress’ intent to eschew a willfulness requirement in the latter….

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